Got the bag?

This autumn, TAMK incoming exchange students have received a bag for a farewell gift. Bags are hanging on the shoulders of 120 students who spent their Autumn 2016 at TAMK. The idea was to give them something lasting and useful that would remind them of us and that they are always welcome back. Also, the bags spread the word of TAMK all around the world!

Marta, Lucia, Jaime and Arga from Spain show how the bags looks like.

Marta, Lucia, Jaime and Arga from Spain show how the bags look like.

 

Text and photo: Marika Kyllönen

 

Tanyu and Virpi presenting the 21st Century Educators program to the world

Tanyu and Virpi presenting the 21st Century Educators programme to the world

Outstanding, highly acclaimed and on top of Europe’s rankings for the past 16 years, the Finnish education system continues to be an appealing topic for many educational institutions around the world. Consider the World Economic Forum and the many articles published on insights and secrets of Finland’s one of the most successful exports to the world. With the doors to the world already open and an increasing worldwide interest, a team of experts from Tampere University of Applied Sciences discovered an undeniable need of educating teachers through innovative methodologies to guarantee immediate results. Meet TAMK’s 21st Century Educators.

21st Century Educators is a fully supported, cohort based, collaborative programme which believes that learning is best undertaken as a social activity in an authentic context. The programme is developed so that it encompasses courses and services which can be delivered either online, face to face or in a blended format by TAMK Global Education. Which countries respond the best to the program? What skills should the educator of the future possess? Customer Relationship Managers, Virpi Heinonen and Tanyu Chen provided me the answers.

The first thing I notice when I step into their office is the chemistry between Virpi and Tanyu and how they conclude each other’s answers. Virpi constantly gives Tanyu the chance to share ideas related to her experience as a researcher well-accustomed to the Chinese market. As a consequence, Tanyu discloses how satisfied she is with her work “I realized that what I learned, researched and analyzed in theory, I can put in practice at TAMK.”

This year, they have worked with partners in China, Brazil, USA, Uruguay, Oman and Myanmar but the first two are the most eager to learn about the Finnish education system and implement the knowledge into their teaching practices. When it comes to China, the opportunities are bigger since the education model is shifting. “In 2015, the Chinese Ministry of Education issued a new policy wanting to have 600 out of 2000 existing higher education institutions transferred to universities of applied sciences. This is a big transformation. If previously the education methods and approaches were adopted from English speaking countries, nowadays China is more focused on the Nordic countries. They are deeply impressed with the Finnish education.” states Tanyu. Despite their sincere enthusiasm, Chinese customers are not easy to reach. For high-end customers, traditional face to face training is preferred to digital studies.

“We have been operating in the Chinese market for two years now and our program is very well known there because China is a very special case. Universities send their leaders to study abroad which means the management and the leadership are the core. Teachers don’t have so many opportunities and their visits here are relatively short. So if we can impact the leaders, then they will make the right decisions regarding the teacher training services.” she adds.

Do they have a follow-up scheme to track the progress of Chinese leaders back in their homeland? “Actually, we do have a follow-up scheme to collect the feedback for those who have learned in Finland and we also have Finnish experts to train the local teachers in China. So far, we received positive feedback from those teachers who attended the teacher trainings. Many of them got promoted or their level of teaching has increased. Teachers are switching their daily practices and taking to their classrooms what they learned from Finland. It’s very difficult in the beginning because their mindsets have changed, but the students’ not yet. The change is gradually happening in the classroom and it’s a slow process. “

Virpi travels more often to Latin American countries and Brazil is a top destination. “With Brazil it is going well. We just had our third graduated group and they are all great ambassadors. They are marketing Finland themselves within the federal institute where they work at so we are expecting more Brazilian teachers next year and we are also sending our teachers to Brazil. Mark Curcher, our Program Director is also taking care of the online program and services besides travelling to Brazil for conferences and workshops. We have traded in Brazil for four years already and there has been a lot of interest in Proakatemia type of innovation weeks, leadership and coaching trainings. TAMK will have a new Master’s programme in Educational Leadership starting in 2017 and the goal is to prepare those who work in educational institutions, HR management, governmental positions or NGO’s.  We are hoping to reach people from different countries with interesting and distinctive backgrounds.”

The must-have competences of a future educator

Is leadership one of the must-have competences of a future educator then? “Definitely. Leadership and coaching skills are the most needed at the moment. An educator has to be able to facilitate the student’s learning process. Students are already capable to find the information they need to support their studies so the teacher’s role is to facilitate the learning conditions and create an experience.” continues Virpi.

“If you go deep, you’ll probably find lots of skills. Lifelong learning and cultural competences are also very important. To always be hungry for learning and developing new skills and share them with your group of students. All student groups are diverse and international and we learn from them as much as they learn from us.”

Virpi and Tanyu have been working together for slightly over one year now and laid the basis of a small, but very efficient team. And while they’re selling the expertise of different degree programmes to other countries, they are counting on all the support they can get from the head of each department and front-line teachers. Especially when they have international visitors interested in class observation, laboratory showing and project presentation. A quick response is crucial in sealing the deals from which the whole institution benefits.

“We need everyone’s help and more effective internal communications in order to reach our future goals and spread the Joy of Discovery to the rest of the world.”

 

Text & photo: Andruta Ilie

 

Read more about 21st Century Educators: http://21stcenturyeducators.tamk.fi/

Discover our brand new Master’s programme: http://www.tamk.fi/web/tamken/educational-leadership-master

International Coordinator, Mirja Onduso and Communicator, Andruta Ilie started organizing a series of Finnish activities at TAMK for international students who study or do their exchange at Tampere University of Applied Sciences. The aim of this project is to introduce students to the Finnish lifestyle while connecting with each other and developing friendships.

Our Finnish activities have reached their end for this year and we wanted our exchange students to take some sweet memories with them back home. Literally and figuratively speaking. For our last event, Mirja and I brought gingerbread in different shapes and a gingerbread house to her office. Many students showed up that day to decorate the cookies and the winner of the house was Cong Nguyen, who says:

“Last Friday afternoon, I walked past the social counselor’s office. Fortunately, it was the time for Finnish activities and many students were already decorating gingerbread cookies. I joined in and decorated a pine tree (it was very beautiful!). I took part in the lottery for the gingerbread house and won it! The gingerbread was so good and it was a great evening.”

Mirja and I would like to thank all our students who joined Finnish activities at TAMK and to all staff members who supported us!

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Text: Andruta Ilie

Photos: Mirja Onduso

International Coordinator, Mirja Onduso and Communicator, Andruta Ilie started organizing a series of Finnish activities at TAMK for international students who study or do their exchange at Tampere University of Applied Sciences. The aim of this project is to introduce students to the Finnish lifestyle while connecting with each other and developing friendships.

We all love giving and receiving cards for Christmas. But what about making them? We tempted our international students with glögi and joulutorttu and invited them to show their artistic skills and make Christmas cards from scratch.

Mirja and I were both impressed with what came out of their hands. This time, it was her turn to tell us about the festive atmosphere in her room:

"Christmas certainly means different things in different countries: while most students draw Christmas trees and decorations, stars, snow flakes, gifts, snowmen, Santa Claus, elves  – one student draws an elephant and another one camels! The Japanese students are professional in drawing Moomins. No matter where we come from, may Christmas bring peace and love to us all! Hyvää joulua!/ Merry Christmas!"

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Text: Andruta Ilie
Photos: Mirja Onduso

 

 

TAMK, TUT and UTA organized an Independence Day Reception on 1st of December 2016 in TAMK main campus. This is a yearly tradition and every year one of the universities have the main responsibility to organize this event. Now it was TAMK’s turn.

This year the programme included a violin concert organized by Tampere Music Academy but also the participants had a chance to hear speeches ´How Finns Celebrate Independence Day´ and ´My Finland – In Eye of an International Student´. But the most amazing moment during the reception was when all the guests sang together the national anthem of Finland ´Maamme´!

Solveig Parikka and Tuomas Turriago playing Jean Sibelius Violin concerto op. 47

Solveig Parikka and Tuomas Turriago playing Jean Sibelius Violin concerto op. 47

The Finnish Indepence Day is a national holiday which is celebrated annually on 6th of December. It marks the Declaration of Independence from the Russian empire by the Finnish Parliament in 1917. The Independence Day celebration is nowadays a vibrant occasion with the blue and white colours of the Finnish flag being proudly displayed. An Independence Day tradition is for Finnish families to light two candles in the windows of their homes in the evening.

It’s extremely important that foreign students and staff members learn as much as possible Finnish culture during their stay in Tampere. Therefore, this kind of event is absolutely worth organizing! This year 130 international quests took part in the Independence Day Reception and enjoyed the solemn but also relaxed atmosphere of the reception.

Students standing in line for Photo Booth.

Students standing in line for Photo Booth.

 

Text: Kirsi Jokipakka, Head of International Services, TAMK

Photos: Kirsi Jokipakka, Head of International Services, TAMK and Tarja Kononov, International Coordinator, TAMK

 

International Coordinator, Mirja Onduso and Communicator, Andruta Ilie started organizing a series of Finnish activities at TAMK for international students who study or do their exchange at Tampere University of Applied Sciences. The aim of this project is to introduce students to the Finnish lifestyle while connecting with each other and developing friendships.

Another week of hard studying is over. We brush off the dust of our collars and we are ready to relax at Kaupinoja sauna. Situated by lake Näsijärvi, the public sauna is open almost everyday and counts around 57 000 visits yearly. Winter months are the busiest. During them, the water is cold but the sauna is hot. What matters most is to listen to your own body. The regular way is to plunge first and last in the cold water, but everybody should choose where they sit in the sauna and for how long they swim, as long as it makes them feel good.

“Kaupinoja sauna was nice. There is a one very big sauna where everyone gathers and outside, a long staircase into the lake. However, the water was so cold that I only managed to go in twice. Gladly, they have a grill outside so Mirja grilled some delicious sausages to keep us warm.” are Daan’s thoughts (Daan Krijnen is one of our exchange students from the Netherlands).

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Text: Andruta Ilie
Photos: Mirja Onduso

 

InnoEvent Tampere was an intensive week during which TAMK students from different fields of study were divided into multi-disciplinary teams with the purpose of  creating innovative solutions to real cases given by a variety of companies and organizations.

One of the participating teams was team ONGO, who aimed to solve a case given by TAYS Central Hospital regarding the difficulties foreigners experience in finding their way around the hospital premises. With most of their instructions in Finnish and about 30% of their patients being illiterate, TAYS is looking for bright and innovative solutions designed to make things easier for its visitors. Team ONGO responded to the challenge by creating a navigation device to guide the patient, once he registered the details of his appointment after arriving at the hospital.

The device is programmed in such a manner to lead the patient to his destination with the help of lighted arrows and there are also three more buttons which indicate how to reach the cafeteria area, toilets and other additional services. So far, the feedback received was quite good and the judges saw it as a realistic option to be considered.

Liza Daviskiba, ONGO team member said she was very pleased with the atmosphere within her team and the amount of work everyone put into the project: “The atmosphere in our group has been really good and that’s one of the key points during an intensive week when you have to spend so much time together and do team work. Everyone has actively participated and there were no language barriers. I think we all enjoyed working with each other.”

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Team ONGO:

Liza Daviskiba
Joonas Kääriainen
Ellanoora Kärkkäinen
Petteri Pelkonen
Catherine Maloney
Suvi Löffler
Matthäus Hörmann

More about InnoEvent Tampere:

Innoevent

Text & photo: Andruta Ilie

International Coordinator, Mirja Onduso and Communicator, Andruta Ilie started organizing a series of Finnish activities at TAMK for international students who study or do their exchange at Tampere University of Applied Sciences. The aim of this project is to introduce students to the Finnish lifestyle while connecting with each other and developing friendships.

With only a few weeks left until Christmas, the atmosphere at TAMK is getting festive and the snow outside is of great help too. Therefore, we thought it would be the best time for our international students to learn how to bake Joulutorttu, a delicious Christmas pastry in shape of a pinwheel with a middle filled with prune jam.

32 hungry students showed up at TAMKO’s kitchen and altogether, 128 Joulutorttu were baked and eaten. By far, the biggest number of students we had during our events, until now. It felt wonderful and rewarding to see them sharing the tasks with a smile upon their faces and waiting patiently to get the pastries out of the oven. Here’s what Ruotong Xu, Chinese exchange student, told us after the event:

"Such a fine day! I joined this lovely activity to bake Joulutorttu: windmill-like pastry. Upon my coming in the room, I felt the warm atmosphere here. So many pretty people with smiling faces, were all busy with their hands working. I just went in and found my place, then threw myself into the work. Firstly, I cut the dough into two pieces and put the jam in the middle, then made it like a windmill. Easy and funny job! After a few minutes, I smelt the flavour of the baked pastry and felt excited to see them because some of them were made by me! Yummy, yummy, I like them! After the baking, a funny game involving fighting for the chairs began. My heart was beating fast at that time because I was extremely excited. I forgot all the worries after this beautiful day! Thank you for organizing this activity!"

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Text: Andruta Ilie

Photos: Laura Wirth, Nao Oikawa and Andruta Ilie

International Coordinator, Mirja Onduso and Communicator, Andruta Ilie started organizing a series of Finnish activities at TAMK for international students who study or do their exchange at Tampere University of Applied Sciences. The aim of this project is to introduce students to the Finnish lifestyle while connecting with each other and developing friendships.

Finland has always been considered one of the world’s healthiest countries. Could it be the pure and raw nature, the quality of life here or the fact that Finns are very active and love their sports? I believe the answer comprises all of those aspects. It’s very common to see people jogging or cycling on the streets no matter the hour. Not to mention how passionate they are about fitness and staying in shape. Their attitude via living a healthy lifestyle is contagious and works as a good motivating factor when you are willing to implement some positive changes to your daily activities.

Tampereen Kiipeilykeskus is a rock climbing and bouldering venue located at a reasonable distance from the city centre. Big enough to host several groups of people, it provides diverse climbing walls and all the equipment needed. Our international students were up for the challenge, especially that some of them have never tried it before. Together, we walked all the way from the city centre to our destination in order to warm up. There, we were offered a warm welcome and explained the safety measurements and how to use the equipment provided. So off we went climbing to test our mental and physical strength.

We reached the top many times, but we also fell on the mats and laughed about it. We checked that we are safe before each and every climbing attempt because we understand what a big difference it makes to go on your journey feeling secure. It gives you a great peace of mind.

What impressed me the most though, apart from the enthusiasm shown by the students and their willingness to push their limits, was their team attitude and the way they supported each other in reaching their climbing goals. Our last part of the session was bouldering one of the walls and stand on top of it. It wasn’t an easy task with not many grips to hold on to and a bit difficult in the end. Our most agile climbers went first to lead the way, followed by the rest of the group. Some of us struggled on our way up, but we received a firm hand to hold and a ton of encouragement to help us. Eventually, we all made it there and we shared a big group hug and congratulated each other for doing our best. It was a truly unforgettable experience!

"It was so much fun to climb and boulder with the group. It's fun to watch how people climb differently and then figure out how you are going to do it yourself. It certainly was difficult at some points, but the challenge is part of the fun. The group itself was very fun to be with, all friendly people who I could share a laugh with." says Daan Krijnen, exchange student from the Netherlands.

"A few years ago I also tried wall climbing, but I could never go further than 1 meter above the ground. So this time, I also believed that I couldn't do it and didn't want to go because if would be a waste of money. Luckily, my friend did wanted to go, so I decided to come anyway and just watch him climb. My inner tree-climbing child couldn't resist those walls and started climbing. And suddenly, I was at the top. That was an amazing feeling. The climb reminded me of a short life lesson. Take it step by step, don't look too far ahead or it might scare you and don't look back, because you've already past that stage. Just take little steps and you'll reach your goal. 

It was amazing to see what I could do, but also what others could do and the most important thing, what we could all do together. Reaching the top all alone feels great, but it feels way better to reach it with the rest." says Ryanne van Vliet, exchange student from the Netherlands.

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Text: Andruta Ilie
Photos: Johan Nguyen & Daan Krijnen

International Coordinator, Mirja Onduso and Communicator, Andruta Ilie started organizing a series of Finnish activities at TAMK for international students who study or do their exchange at Tampere University of Applied Sciences. The aim of this project is to introduce students to the Finnish lifestyle while connecting with each other and developing friendships.

Located in the heart of Tampere, Spy Museum is the world’s first public museum of international espionage. The idea of the museum belongs to Teppo Turja and the it was turned into reality in 1998. With more than 20,000 visitors every year, Spy Museum is one of the must-see places in Tampere to which some of our international students said yes.

"On the 28th of October, we went to the first Spy Museum in the world. It is located in the Media 57 building and connected with another small shopping mall, which used to be a factory. Student tickets are only 6 euro, but if you want to take photos, you need to pay an extra 5 euros. There are guides in many different languages so me and my friend got one in Chinese. We knew about the history of spying all over the world, and there are also many spy staffs that we tried. First of all, colorless pens which used to hide the information, can only be seen under a special light. And a machine that can recognize real cash, visa cards and even our resident permits. The most interesting one was the voice changer, so funny. And the creepiest one was the double sided mirror. I only saw them in the movies. Anyhow, it is a really nice museum."  says Yimeng Chen, Energy and Environmental student from China.

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Text: Andruta Ilie

Photos: Mirja Onduso
In the photos: Yimeng Chen and Anni Chen trying voice-altering, a German war-time naval light used for communication and inspecting uniforms and weapons.