Posts in the trainee category

Viola-koti is a sheltered house for elderly in Tampere. It provides sheltered housing for 60 residents but also sports and rehabilitation services to both residents and elderly living in their own homes. Viola-koti has had international exchange trainees for example from Spain, Hungary, Poland and Belgium during the years it has been cooperating with TAMK.

– People living in their own homes prefer swimming pools, residents participate more in other groups. We also try to support family caregivers, for example by drawing up chair exercises to them, physiotherapist Teija Vihervaara says.

– Clients like foreign trainees even though the language is sometimes challenging. Some of them have been living abroad, so they are happy to speak English.

Helmi Vahtera, Maire Järvinen and Maija Pöri participated in chair exercise.

Helmi Vahtera, Maire Järvinen and Maija Pöri participated in chair exercise.

According to Teija’s experience, students’ cultural background has an effect how students react to situations they confront in placements.

– Some students don´t think it is very important that elderly people leave their homes and come here to get social contacts. Also students’ own culture affects how clients are contacted.

Before Viola-koti, Hungarian physiotherapy students Edit Sió and Hanna Szolnoky had been at Tammelakeskus health centre. What kind of differences in physiotherapy have they discovered between Hungary and Finland?

– It has been useful to see how physiotherapists do their job in Finland. At Tammelakeskus we got our perception about the health centre. It was a new experience for us, because in Hungary there are no health centres, only hospitals, Edit says.

 

Edit and Hanna have enjoyed their stay in Tampere.

Edit and Hanna have enjoyed their stay in Tampere.

– Individual therapy is really common in Hungary. In Finland, there is more group therapy, for example at gyms. In Hungary, if you had a surgery you go to physiotherapy every day, while in Finland the responsibility for rehabilitation is given more to a patient, students say.

– I think you have understood the importance of prevention, that´s the most important thing. My impression is that in Hungary elderly are not in that good physical condition as in Finland, Edit says.

– Language barrier is higher when working with elderly, so misunderstandings are more common than with younger people. However, clients are really motivated. They want to know what is the purpose of each exercise, Hanna and Edit say.

 

Text and photos: Marika Kyllönen

Belgian physiotherapy students Lisa Swinnen and Karolien Mertens are doing their three-month exchange period in TAMK. Tammenlehväkeskus was their second placement.

– We thought that this is a rehabilitation centre for war veterans, but actually here are people of all ages and conditions, Karolien says.

The period at Tammenlehväkeskus has been very agreeable for the students. They have done various tasks and got known completely new forms of rehabilitation. Perhaps this would be something they could apply to their future profession.

– Hydrotherapy is not very common in Belgium, but in Finland it seems that there are therapy pools here and there. And salt room, we had never seen nor heard anything about it before we came here.

Karolien makes sure that Kari Kumpulainen carries out the exercise correctly.

Karolien makes sure that Kari Kumpulainen carries out the exercise correctly.

– We are oriented in musculoskeletal conditions, but at Tammenlehväkeskus we have worked in the field of neurological rehabilitation. It is useful to have experience outside of our field of know-how and to know widely about things, they say.

The lack of a common language brings its own specialties and challenges.

– For most clients, the situation is not tricky. They don´t mind even though we don´t understand Finnish, many of them understand English a little. They appreciate the fact that we speak some Finnish and many are trying to teach us more words, such as numbers, Lisa and Karolien say.

 

 

 

 

The gym at Tammenlehväkeskus is a familiar place to Raija Vento.

The gym at Tammenlehväkeskus is a familiar place to Raija Vento.

Hungarian Petra Dunai did her exchange in TAMK in the spring 2013. Tammenlehväkeskus was one of her training placements at that time and what happened: Petra found her way back.

Petra Dunai feels at home at Tammenlehväkeskus.

Petra Dunai feels at home at Tammenlehväkeskus.

– I met my boyfriend here in Tampere. I went back to Hungary to finish my studies and came back in November 2013. I didn´t speak Finnish then so I enrolled for an intensive course which took 10 months. I noticed that Tammenlehväkeskus searched for a substitute for a physiotherapist so I decided to apply for it. I got the position and started to work here in last December. I really enjoy working here, Petra says in excellent Finnish.

Rehabilitation Manager Titta Soimasuo has been satisfied with the international trainees.

– We have received positive feedback on all the trainees we have had here. Our staff and our clients have a positive attitude towards foreign students. Positive experiences feed the interest to continue taking foreign trainees, Titta says.

 

Text and photos: Marika Kyllönen